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chicagopcclcar

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About chicagopcclcar

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    CTA L/Subway, Amtrak NE Corridor, Union Pacific
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    PCC St. Louis, 22, 33, 35, 6719, 6720

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  1. CTA HERITAGE FLEET IS BRINGING BACK TWO PCC CARS, 6101-6102

    By 1955, 270 new PCC 6000 series had been received, all assigned to the North-South route. These cars marked a big change….the conductor had a cab in the “B” end of each married pair (#6201-6470). But pair of cabs in each car meant conductors have to cross whenever station platforms changed side….so a new modification was developed. A work station was developed using only the “B” end of the odd-numbered car and the last 250 PCC 6000 series sported this design (#6471-6720). CTA engineers quickly put together the same modification for the first 200 cars(#6001-6200) by cutting a space on the carboy sides for a drop window and installing the door controls inside. A PA system as included too. Within a few years, all conductors worked inside except those working 4000 series equipment. Photo: #6101 shows the inside modification with door control reversed. Photos taken at Skokie Shops. Photo: An outside view of #6101 showing the blank filler where the outside door controller was mounted. DH
  2. CTA HERITAGE FLEET IS BRINGING BACK TWO PCC CARS, 6101-6102

    It's GeneKing7320's happy birthday! Not mine. I was only quoting his statement. How much has a search for pole equipped "L" cars gotten lost. WOW. DH
  3. CTA HERITAGE FLEET IS BRINGING BACK TWO PCC CARS, 6101-6102

    You can't see poles without seeing the boards. Resource tells me the poles were taken off before the car were assigned to the North-South. As I mentioned, todays similarity, the former Yellow line cars now running on Brown and Orange lines with their roof boards still attached. By the way, those cars are banned from service on Blue line. DH
  4. CTA HERITAGE FLEET IS BRINGING BACK TWO PCC CARS, 6101-6102

    Photos: The recreated color scheme included the original cream roofs, as delivered. The smoke, coal soot, steel mill pollution in the air that caused the delivered cream roof to be repainted green is absent in the atmosphere today. Photo: The CTA medallion didn't age well. DH
  5. CTA HERITAGE FLEET IS BRINGING BACK TWO PCC CARS, 6101-6102

    The SKOKIE SWIFT was mandated to be A NON-STOP SERVICE.....using only one operator. IT USED CTA's 70 MPH CARS. BusHunter. why can't you get this idea? NON-STOP SERVICE!!!! CTA, George Krambles, all were on accord. There would be NO STOPPING TO CHANGE TROLLEY POLES to third rail. BusHunter, why is this so hard to understand? DH
  6. CTA HERITAGE FLEET IS BRINGING BACK TWO PCC CARS, 6101-6102

    #6101-6102 made their grand debut at the 2017 CTA Transit Jamboree at Skokie Shops for employees, their families, retired employees, guests, on Saturday, Aug. 26. The Cincinnati Cars, 4271-4271, gave rides to participants. DH
  7. CTA HERITAGE FLEET IS BRINGING BACK TWO PCC CARS, 6101-6102

    The former Evanston pole equipped cars, removed from that line in 1957, were assigned to the North-South. Did you see trolley poles or just the roof boards without the poles. Similar to today's experience where the former Yellow line 3200 series cars are running on the Brown and Orange lines with their roof boards still in place but without the overhead catenary pantographs. There are photos showing #6123-6130 series running on the NS route without the poles but keeping their boards. DH
  8. CTA HERITAGE FLEET IS BRINGING BACK TWO PCC CARS, 6101-6102

    Photos showing CTA #6101 being loaded in S. Elgin, IL. Credit: Joseph Hazinski; shot Wednesday 8/9/17 at FRTM
  9. CTA HERITAGE FLEET IS BRINGING BACK TWO PCC CARS, 6101-6102

    The story of 18 "flat door" 6000s doesn't end here (#6001-6200). 18 CTA cars were purchased for $250.00 per car plus shipping and handling by SEPTA, the transit agency in Pennsylvania. SEPTA determined those cars, "could be made ready for their Norristown service with the least amount of difficulty. And SEPTA already had the experience of converting the two North Shore Electroliners to "LibertyLiners." Ironically, the flatdoor 6000s being considered for purchase were all on the Ravenswood line and were being replaced by the Budd 2600s built in Philadelphia. Twelve cars were chosen, four were already pulled from service (#6151/6152, 6161/6162). The remainder were in service and asked to be set aside (#6079/6080, 6089-6090, 6109-6110, and 6139-6140) The cars would be acquired "as is" minus their ATC packages, truck plows, and trolley shoe assemblies. Six more cars would be purchased bringing the total purchase of 18 cars. CTA cars entered Norristown service December, 1986 keeping their CTA numbers. The Norristown line has a standard width at the floor of 10 ft. so an 8 in. threshold was welded onto the outside at each doorway. A conductor's position was created in each car next to the rear doorway by removing a full seat opposite the motorman's cab from the bank of six middle seats. A farebox and a plug-in for the hand held buzzer completed the set-up. The conductor stood inside the front car and operated from here. The door controls were moved to the motorman's cab. The motorman opened and closed the doors upon signalling from the conductor by the buzzer. A cord was hung from front to rear and passengers pulled the cord for a stop just like on a bus! At terminals, all four doors opened. Also at terminals, the crews switched positions. The conductor became the motorman on the trip back and the motorman became the conductor. The Norristown route was like the Evanston, but two tracked and with about twenty station stops. A big long bridge across a big river at the Norristown end was single-tracked. That bridge is forcing a line curtailment in 2013. The line is third rail powered, the trolley rail being covered, so paddle shoes were added to the CTA cars. The line suffers from a lot of leaves and moisture on the rails so the new cars that replaced the PCCs have a complicated computer controlled "slip-slide" operation. Of the 18 cars sent to PA, four were scrapped. 14 are still in PA. Four are in good shape....Middletown & Hummelstown #476/7, SEPTA #482/483 (stored in yard at Philly). The rest are in a forest owned by Vintage Electric Streetcar 478-81, 484-9, at Windber, PA. These cars are in bad, bad shape. Photos: Screenshots from my video, MSIBNSF. DH
  10. CTA HERITAGE FLEET IS BRINGING BACK TWO PCC CARS, 6101-6102

    I'm have trouble understanding parts of your questions, but I'll try. Evanston had trolley wire, Skokie had catenary. Evanston had wire all the way. Skokie was mid-stream. Both lines used one-man operation. Operators on the Evanston put their poles up at the start and put them down at the end of the run. Skokie operators had to put their overhead collectors up and down, in mid-stream NON-STOP. There was no way that trolley pole could do this....pans had to be fashioned to do this. Stopping the one-man operation to put up poles on the Skokie was not ever thought about....a no-go! EDIT....Maybe some additional info will help. The simple trolley wire is often not suitable for pantograph/pans. They get caught up in the hangers and frogs over track switches unless special fixtures are included in the overhead wire. North Shore interurbans and CRT/CTA trains had conductors and trainmen who handled the pole duties on the Skokie/Niles Center mid-stream operations. When the CTA opted for one-man operation on the Evanston, the twelve cars selected were equipped with poles at each end, cabs with fare equipment, single door operation from the cab, and side doors next to the cabs. They were maned by operators, not by motormen or conductors. The CTA and the union agreed only one car was operated and pay was the same as bus operators. During rush hours, the one-man cars were coupled into duces or quads and operated with a motorman and a conductor. The conductor used the standard door control mounted in the side wall of the cabs. EDIT.... I've learned that the twelve one-man cars selected for Evanston service did indeed have roof boards installed before entering service....but no poles: #39-50. Photo: Yes this was taken at IRM, Union, IL. but yours truly ran these in Evanston one-man service....loved the midnights, loved the one-man cars. DH
  11. CTA HERITAGE FLEET IS BRINGING BACK TWO PCC CARS, 6101-6102

    Another second color scheme 6000 series seen on the Congress median line. The CTA never changed the name of that route when on Jan. 10, 1964, the Chicago City Council renamed the Congress Expressway after former President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Photo: (Collection of Joe Testagrose).
  12. CTA HERITAGE FLEET IS BRINGING BACK TWO PCC CARS, 6101-6102

    Only a few 6000s had trolley poles installed. Ironically, this pair is seen after the third rail was installed on the Evanston line. DH
  13. CTA HERITAGE FLEET IS BRINGING BACK TWO PCC CARS, 6101-6102

    No sooner than one year when the first 130 order of 6000 series cars were delivered, a second order of 70 cars was ordered in 1952. The second order came with a simplified color scheme which eliminated the broad green band through the standee windows. Within two years, the color scheme was changed again and the dark green pin stripe was eliminated and the original fancy four colors were repainted as the original 130 came due for maintenance. Photo: 6000 series from the original is seen at Kimball terminal in 1964 in the simplified scheme. Jerry Appleman.
  14. Four Years Ago CTA Ran Ceremonial Last Run of 2200

    Photo 6. SB the Ceremonial stops at Racine. Photo 7. SB amid the traffic on I-290. Photo 8. Approaching Des Plaines/ ForestPark terminal. DH
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