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Montell305

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About Montell305

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday 06/10/1978

Profile Information

  • Location
    Toledo, Ohio
  • Favorite Bus
    Propane Flxible - 8700's

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1425 profile views
  1. old cta photos

    Nice photos. Admin, is there any chance of getting a section for these old photos in the "Photos" section of the web site? It would be great to have all of the old bus pictures that pop up in the forum grouped in one spot. Just a thought. This is a great site.
  2. Archiving the sounds of buses

    I would love to hear a propane Flxible as well, though I expect one would be hard to come by today. I would rather hear one of the 8700's but I would be satisfied with any propane transit bus. I always figured they would sound somewhat like a gasoline/propane school bus does where the engine is not really all that loud and you hear the transmission very distinctly. I know that CHBM has an 8700 but I am not sure that it runs. Sound (and video) recordings are a great idea. I always enjoy hearing/watching them online. I would love to see more Chicago and Midwestern stuff out there. Everything on the web seems to be Canadian or the NYC area. NYC has enough of their influence everywhere, long live Chicagoland and the Midwest. I understand where you’re coming from on this but.... there were plenty of buses that I disliked back in the day and now that they are gone I would even like to reminisce on what they were like again. Anyway, great idea, I'll look forward to your work. B)
  3. New Flyer D40LF #1000 Photos & Assignment Information

    Actually, the way I understood the news article shown here: http://www.chicagobus.org/archives/18/ I believe that only a little more than half of the 5300 series buses will be retired and the rest will continue to be operated unless the Legislator comes up with more money. Any idea on how the CTA will determine which buses of the series to retire? Also I know that I am in the minority here but I actually like the new logo with the old paint job. Do you think that as older buses are repaired/repainted they will also recieve this logo design? I think it sorta has a retro look like the logos the buses had back in the 50's & 60's. :cool:
  4. Novabus LF and Gillig Low Floors

    I hope that I don't come across like a bus snob but actually neither of you are correct. Trying to pin down the last Flxible bus is actually a pretty confusing task. The last Flxible buses officially delivered (all Metro models of course) were part of an order for 25 buses for Baltimore, MD however the factory closed in 1995 before they all could be built. Only 19 of the buses ever made it to Baltimore, they are serial #'s 106487 - 106505. I believe that these buses are still in operation today as Baltimore MTA's 9521-9539. I had read on an enthusiasts web site one time that it was rumored that 3 or 4 more buses of this order were partially completed in the Flxible factory but were never finished. I do not know for sure the final disposition of those buses or if they ever actually existed in the first place. In spite of the Baltimore order, the last buses to actually leave the factory were 8 units for Monterey, CA serial #'s 106158 - 106165. As if this wasn't confusing enough the highest actual serial number for an Flxible bus is 106591 that is the last bus in an order for COTA in Columbus, Ohio. So, depending on what criteria you use, the last bus could be any one of these buses.:cool: Information sourced from: "Flxible: A History of the Bus and the Company" by Robert R. Ebert Ph.D. & "The Baltimore Transit Archives" http://www.btco.net/index2.html
  5. 7200 series Mack Buses

    Yes, very interested.
  6. Cta fish at south shops

    Both have non-standard turn signal lamps. They are missing the surrounds. I believe that the CTA ordered them factory that way. :cool:
  7. Propane & Propane Accessories

    Did the propane buses basically sound like a gasoline/propane school bus?
  8. Bus Models

    St. Petersburg Tram offers many detailed models of old (pre 60's)Chicago buses and streetcars. I have never purchased one but they look really nice. Their web site is: http://www.sptc.spb.ru/ I believe the company is based in Russia.
  9. Historic Buses At Kedzie Garage.

    Actually 8499 is not a Flxible new look, it does have a new look front end but the rest of the bus is like the old Flxible propane bus body. It was a special bus, built in 1960 by Flxible as a platform to try out the 6V-71 diesel engine that GM had now given Flxible permission to use. Unlike the propanes, the diesel is located in the back of the bus (where the fuel tank was on the propane buses) and was mounted in a "t-drive" configuration. I believe that it's a Spicer 184 transmission. The bus was orignally built with the old style front end but they converted it at the factory to try out their "new-look" style. The new-look buses that Flxible began producing in 1961 made use of this front end as well as a re-designed body that looked alot more like a current year GM bus. 8499 is a very special bus! :cool:
  10. Propane & Propane Accessories

    Ok, sorry about the "King of the Hill" subject line, but I couldn't resist.:cool: Anyway, I am a bus fan from Toledo, Ohio and very much enjoy visiting Chicago and riding the CTA. Being only four hours away the windy city provides a great weekend getaway with some A+ bus watching. So here is what I was wondering, what were the CTA Flxible Propane buses like to watch/ride/drive? What did they sound like? I have always thought that CTA's propane fleet was a very interesting operation that was abandoned too soon. Being that the last propane buses were retired in 1976, two years before I was born, I never had the opportunity to see or ride them in person. IMHO, I feel that the virtues of the propane bus are still greater than the diesel buses in terms of maintenance cost, emissions and longevity. I think this is especially true with respect to today’s technology as it pertains to starting and fuel metering. I also feel that the propane unit is a better option than the CNG bus. CNG has a shorter range then propane and while propane is heavier than air, Chicago proved that it could be handled in large volumes safely during their 26-year tenure with the fuel. CNG buses also require a more complicated fueling station than propane. Anyhow, just curious, if anyone has anything to contribute I would like to hear it. Thanks!! -Brian:shy:
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