chicagopcclcar

Red Line Is "Goin Back To Ashland-63rd"

61 posts in this topic

“THE RED LINE IS GOING BACK ASHLAND”…….TURN UP THE MUSIC to the JacksonFive recording “Goin’ Back to Indiana.” But this “goin’ back” is so much different than when the Dan Ryan was closed a few years ago. This time Green line trains will run to Ashland/63 at all of their regular hours. This time Red line trains will only serve Ashland at certain rush hours. And for 24 hours everyday, Red line trains will still serve 95th St.

Starting, Monday, April 03, 2017 through “TBD”….. During morning and evening rush periods only, some Red Line trains will be rerouted south of Roosevelt onto the South Side elevated and Ashland branch (normally used by Green Line trains). These trains will operate between Howard and Ashland/63rd, via the subway.

Between 7:53 and 9:17, at Roosevelt southbound, there will be 29 trains, 14 go to Ashland and 15 go to 95th. Each train is on a three minute headway. 

Question……How many passengers see the head end signs. How many only see the side signs. At Roosevelt, passengers who didn’t know about the reroute might learn about it then. And for public announcements over the PA....lets hope the man from Milwaukee has his announcements “on cue.” If all announcements were for naught, there will be some passengers getting off at Cermak wondering how to get to their destinations.

Northbound, in AM, in-between 8:44 and 9:56 am, 95th will send 15 trains northbound on a headway of six minutes....that is regular service. Ashland will send six additional/extra trains north. 13th tower will merge those extra trains at Roosevelt so Howard will receive 21 trains. 95th terminal and the Dan Ryan service will not miss anything. The six additional/extra trains carry eight deadhead crews back to Howard. They also bring the 48 cars for Howard to yard until the PM rush.

In the PM rush hour, Howard will dispatch six Red line trains to Ashland/63. They are scheduled to leave Roosevelt from 3:39 through 4:45. These trains also carry eight deadhead crews. Passengers need to choose how they are going to their destinations by the time they reach Roosevelt. Ashland will use these six trains plus the eight trains stored in the yard to dispatch 14 northbound Red line trains for the peak PM rush. 13th St. tower will merge these trains with those sent north from 95th St. and all the trains will make the peak rush hour to Howard.

Going back to the “man from Milwaukee”, a CTA spokesman said, “It's also still a choosable sequence in the prerecorded announcement system rather the operator announcements.” He added more information, “Yes, announcements  were programmed into the 5000s starting back in 2013, even though there weren't many 5000s on Red line during the other reroute, for maximum flexibility for equipment usage. 

Rerouted Red line trains will use LED rollsigns with white text on red background……white “Ashland/63 on red background. Also, it was felt best to just use the existing signs, since they're already out there, and the re-route is very limited (only rush, only for six months). The readings are also still on the roller curtains. 
  
“When an operator logs into the OCU and enters an 8xx or 9xx run number, the options for origin and destination are Howard, 95th, and Ashland/63 -- it has been since 2013. It was never taken out,” the spokesman said.

Finally, over the three prior weeks, there was some dispute about employee pick for the new schedule.  There was a legal agreement between the CTA and the rail local union ATU 308 known as the 10 hour rule, which meant that rail workers had to have minimum 10 hours between runs, or shifts.  The judge gave the union a favorable decision. The schedules will be redone, the workers need to re-pick. This will result in the week delay for a second pick. Instead, the reroute will go into effect as scheduled on April 3. The first pick  will last one week and the second pick will begin in the following week.

Enjoy this session of “Goin’ Back to Ashland/63rd.”

Photos: Car card showing map; Ashland service in the first re-routes; Schedules northbound, southbound; 6000 PCC Rollsign Englewood-Howard "A".

DH

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27 minutes ago, chicagopcclcar said:

“THE RED LINE IS GOING BACK ASHLAND”…….TURN UP THE MUSIC to the JacksonFive recording “Goin’ Back to Indiana.” But this “goin’ back” is so much different than when the Dan Ryan was closed a few years ago. This time Green line trains will run to Ashland/63 at all of their regular hours. This time Red line trains will only serve Ashland at certain rush hours. And for 24 hours everyday, Red line trains will still serve 95th St.

Starting, Monday, April 03, 2017 through “TBD”….. During morning and evening rush periods only, some Red Line trains will be rerouted south of Roosevelt onto the South Side elevated and Ashland branch (normally used by Green Line trains). These trains will operate between Howard and Ashland/63rd, via the subway.

Between 7:53 and 9:17, at Roosevelt southbound, there will be 29 trains, 14 go to Ashland and 15 go to 95th. Each train is on a three minute headway. 

Question……How many passengers see the head end signs. How many only see the side signs. At Roosevelt, passengers who didn’t know about the reroute might learn about it then. And for public announcements over the PA....lets hope the man from Milwaukee has his announcements “on cue.” If all announcements were for naught, there will be some passengers getting off at Cermak wondering how to get to their destinations.

Northbound, in AM, in-between 8:44 and 9:56 am, 95th will send 15 trains northbound on a headway of six minutes....that is regular service. Ashland will send six additional/extra trains north. 13th tower will merge those extra trains at Roosevelt so Howard will receive 21 trains. 95th terminal and the Dan Ryan service will not miss anything. The six additional/extra trains carry eight deadhead crews back to Howard. They also bring the 48 cars for Howard to yard until the PM rush.

In the PM rush hour, Howard will dispatch six Red line trains to Ashland/63. They are scheduled to leave Roosevelt from 3:39 through 4:45. These trains also carry eight deadhead crews. Passengers need to choose how they are going to their destinations by the time they reach Roosevelt. Ashland will used these six trains plus the eight trains stored in the yard to dispatch 14 northbound Red line trains for the peak PM rush. 13th St. tower will merge these trains with those sent north from 95th St. and all the trains will make the peak rush hour to Howard.

Going back to the “man from Milwaukee”, a CTA spokesman said, “It's also still a choosable sequence in the prerecorded announcement system rather the operator announcements.” He added more information, “Yes, announcements  were programmed into the 5000s starting back in 2013, even though there weren't any 5000s on Red line during the other reroute, for maximum flexibility for equipment usage. 

Rerouted Red line trains will use LED rollsigns with white text on red background……white “Ashland/63 on red background. Also, it was felt best to just use the existing signs, since they're already out there, and the re-route is very limited (only rush, only for six months). The readings are also still on the roller curtains. 
  
“When an operator logs into the OCU and enters an 8xx or 9xx run number, the options for origin and destination are Howard, 95th, and Ashland/63 -- it has been since 2013. It was never taken out,” the spokesman said.

Finally, over the three prior weeks, there was some dispute about employee pick for the new schedule.  There was a legal agreement between the CTA and the rail local union ATU 308 known as the 10 hour rule, which meant that rail workers had to have minimum 10 hours between runs, or shifts.  The judge gave the union a favorable decision. The schedules will be redone, the workers need to re-pick. This will result in the week delay for a second pick. Instead, the reroute will go into effect as scheduled on April 3. The first pick  will last one week and the second pick will begin in the following week.

Enjoy this session of “Goin’ Back to Ashland/63rd.”

Photos: Car card showing map; Ashland service in the first re-routes; Schedules northbound, southbound; 6000 PCC Rollsign Englewood-Howard "A".

DH

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I definately remember 5000s being on the red line during the 2013. May not have been 100 percent assign like today but there definately were

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15 minutes ago, Sam92 said:

I definately remember 5000s being on the red line during the 2013. May not have been 100 percent assign like today but there definately were

Correct. I remember someone claiming that the signs were not programmable, and then couldn't understand how a red Ashland-63 digital sign showed up.

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1 hour ago, Busjack said:

Correct. I remember someone claiming that the signs were not programmable, and then couldn't understand how a red Ashland-63 digital sign showed up.

Both responses are correct. Here's a photo by CK Ellison showing a re-route train of 5000s coming down the south incline. The initial LED rollsigns were non-programmable according to CTA system designers . The "yellow" LEDs I believe. Then the color-LED rollsigns were adopted and were then installed with the programmable  feature. The first car with color LEDs was 5115. Color LEDs were retrofit on cars 5001-5114 that were already in service by Bombardier. I corrected the spokesman's error in the opening topic. Thanks.

DH

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3 hours ago, chicagopcclcar said:

Both responses are correct. Here's a photo by CK Ellison showing a re-route train of 5000s coming down the south incline. The initial LED rollsigns were non-programmable according to CTA system designers . The "yellow" LEDs I believe. Then the color-LED rollsigns were adopted and were then installed with the programmable  feature. The first car with color LEDs was 5115. Color LEDs were retrofit on cars 5001-5114 that were already in service by Bombardier. I corrected the spokesman's error in the opening topic. Thanks.

DH

17618853_1546617482015741_2020129729_n.jpg

I think the thing was 5000s to 63rd used yellow-yellow marker lights while the 2600s used yellow-green

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3 hours ago, chicagopcclcar said:

Both responses are correct. Here's a photo by CK Ellison showing a re-route train of 5000s coming down the south incline. The initial LED rollsigns were non-programmable according to CTA system designers . The "yellow" LEDs I believe. Then the color-LED rollsigns were adopted and were then installed with the programmable  feature. The first car with color LEDs was 5115. Color LEDs were retrofit on cars 5001-5114 that were already in service by Bombardier. I corrected the spokesman's error in the opening topic. Thanks.

DH

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I really hope whoever made the decision to go with the features and functionality of the amber-LED signs was removed from future decisions. RGB LEDs were most certainly affordable, even when the 5000s were new, and to make the move to digital signage and then omit the ability to reprogram it was incredibly short sighted. Clearly someone saw things the same way partway through the buildout. 

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33 minutes ago, Scionic said:

I really hope whoever made the decision to go with the features and functionality of the amber-LED signs was removed from future decisions. RGB LEDs were most certainly affordable, even when the 5000s were new, and to make the move to digital signage and then omit the ability to reprogram it was incredibly short sighted. Clearly someone saw things the same way partway through the buildout. 

I am not a system designer for LED signs. May I cite you to  a discussion on the topic.......www.chicago-l..... The website states that LED technology improved much after the initial planning and contracts were signed. Stroll down to the discussion on changing the LED signs......http://www.chicago-l.org/trains/roster/5000mkII.html

DH

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4 hours ago, chicagopcclcar said:

I am not a system designer for LED signs. May I cite you to  a discussion on the topic.......www.chicago-l..... The website states that LED technology improved much after the initial planning and contracts were signed. Stroll down to the discussion on changing the LED signs......http://www.chicago-l.org/trains/roster/5000mkII.html

DH

I've read that before, and I still don't buy it. I've been working with full-color RGBs since around the time of the RFP as a hobbyist, but clearly there were commercial considerations at play that I'm not considering. Maybe it's a durability thing, earlier RGB LEDs had poor color reproduction and failed pretty easily. 

 

That aside, producing digital signage without the ability to easily reprogram it seems like a poor decision to make. Otherwise, what's even the point of moving away from Mylar scrolls?

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36 minutes ago, Scionic said:

That aside, producing digital signage without the ability to easily reprogram it seems like a poor decision to make....

But that's a falsehood. The specs (I downloaded the ones for the signs put on the 3200s and quoted them here) say they are programmable.
 

Now whether those, rather than the dot matrix ones, were available when the 5000s contract was let in about 2006, I don't know. Axion had on its site an article* about how CTA came to them with a need for something different on the 5000s due to dissatisfaction with the dot matrix signs, and they were able to provide a solution. Then Axion got the contract for the 3200s.

C13RI1013725334081257.00 10/07/2013AXION TECHNOLOGIES LTD.FURNISH AND DELIVER 261 FULL COLOR LED DESTINATION SIGN KITS INCLUDING SIGN BOXES, CONTROL PANELS, CAPITAL SPARES, MANUALS, TEST EQUIPMENT AND TRAININ

_____

*But the link is now broken.

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Someone asked would the re-routes affect going to the Sox games, starting on Monday. The first three games are afternoon games and the starting times are hours before the PM reroute starts. Friday's game is a night game starting hours after the PM rush.

Photo: Personal photo of the White Sox ball field  taken from a previous charter. 

 

P1010807.JPG

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16 hours ago, Busjack said:

But that's a falsehood. The specs (I downloaded the ones for the signs put on the 3200s and quoted them here) say they are programmable.
 

Now whether those, rather than the dot matrix ones, were available when the 5000s contract was let in about 2006, I don't know. Axion had on its site an article* about how CTA came to them with a need for something different on the 5000s due to dissatisfaction with the dot matrix signs, and they were able to provide a solution. Then Axion got the contract for the 3200s.

C13RI1013725334081257.00 10/07/2013AXION TECHNOLOGIES LTD.FURNISH AND DELIVER 261 FULL COLOR LED DESTINATION SIGN KITS INCLUDING SIGN BOXES, CONTROL PANELS, CAPITAL SPARES, MANUALS, TEST EQUIPMENT AND TRAININ

_____

*But the link is now broken.

The current full-color signs are programmable, as we've established. I am talking about the amber LED signs that came installed in 5001-5116 or so. Reading back through the thread it was indicated these were not programmable. 

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7 hours ago, Scionic said:

The current full-color signs are programmable, as we've established. I am talking about the amber LED signs that came installed in 5001-5116 or so. Reading back through the thread it was indicated these were not programmable. 

At least you agreed that the first LED roll signs were not programmable. Two others agreed too. Mr. Busjack is the only who doesn't want to agree. He keep referring to one other person. I don't know if he is referring to me of someone else. He in the past bragged about using the forum feature to delete my topics, answers, etc. I am not sure if he see my responses when someone else repeats topics. Yes, Busjack and myself did argue about rollsigns. The history is mostly in a topic far removed...."South Side Ashland Green Line...."  Enjoy.

Busjack
On April 8, 2013 at 8:22 PM, chicagopcclcar said:
Green signs unless they spend an awful lot of money toput in new the 5000s' roll signs. Remember, they are not programmable as they are.
Green is supposed to be 5000s by then. Why put in electronic matrix signs if they are not programmable?
  
chicagopcclcar
I believe someone explained this on this forum.

chicagopcclcar
They did explain it. The rollsigns on the 5000s are NOT electronic matrix signs. They are LED pictures of the mylar roll signs.
 
Busjack
Which can be reprogrammed with any drawing program or Photoshop. Even on your PC.

chicagopcclcar

See Tea Eh, on 07 Mar 2013 - 11:55, said

What I've been told regarding the 5000s (I add that qualification, since I don't have first-hand experience with that equipment) is that the signs are pre-set based on the operator inputting a run number into the OCU. If they don't have a specific trip programmed into that run number, it won't be able to display whatever the alternate service pattern is.

I'm under the impression that it's apparently not a simple thing to reprogram the OCU, though it absolutely must be possible (they are computers, and computers can be reprogrammed, it's just a matter of the difficulty in doing so).

I've also been told that this was known prior to the 5000s entering service, and that some folks weren't exactly happy with that inflexibility in the design specifications. Technically speaking, there's no reason the system couldn't be programmed to have every color and every station as a destination. However, once the specs were set, changing the design of that software would have required a change order and CTA paying a bunch of money to get the system changed.

I don't know why they didn't do this, since it seems it would be worth it in many cases (any rail disruption).

Busjack
... Technically speaking, there's no reason the system couldn't be programmed to have every color and every station as a destination. ...

I don't know why they didn't do this, since it seems it would be worth it in many cases (any rail disruption).

Memory limits would limit the number of signs.

However, if there is something limiting taking out one sign and substituting another, that's strange. For instance, the green 63-Ashland sign won't be needed for Green Line trains, or more extreme the Red 95th sign won't be needed at all.

Since the OCU or TOTS or however the operator's console is denominated also has to run the various versions of the audio announcements, it is hard to believe that CTA would leave them disabled for 5 months. At a minimum, since the ones in the 5000s are gps controlled, if a new variation for the Red Line were not programmed in before an operator punches in the code, once the train goes on the Green, the gps won't recognize it, just like BusTracker doesn't recognize detoured buses. Again, CTA might let that go for a couple of weeks due to Wells, but five months would be a mess.

I'll only concede that if the signs are graphics files, rather than generated on the fly like the orange LED ones are, the graphics files need to be edited.
 
nflyer22

As an undergrad in computer engineering, allow me to shed some light on the situation with my thoughts.

Like any picture stored on a computer, the LED signs are a 2D array of pixels (in our case, LEDs). Each pixel is "set" a certain value, and that value determines what color or hue that particular pixel should be. The whole combination of pixels gives us the overall picture we see. The matrix of values of pixels is then stored as a whole (i.e. your typical .jpg, .bmp, etc. image file) for simplicity reasons (it's much easier to pull up one file rather than several million files! :) ).1

From this, I believe that when a run number is entered, and the operator chooses a destination, the computer unit pulls up a single file, of which that file tells what sign is put up. With a wide assortment of destination signs for all lines, I have my doubts that memory is an issue.2 (The New Flyers have their assortment of destinations for all the bus routes, although I have seen some Novas display blank signs when routes got shifted between garages.)

My notion that the CTA chose such signs are for reasons such as reroutes or extensions, when older destination signs become obsolete and new ones are needed. If the agency does not have smooth access to adjust these signs when necessary then what's the point in getting them at all?

Regardless I'm curious myself as to how this whole scenario will play out beginning next month.
1 This is by all means not a complete description of image storage and processing. There are many other aspects of computer science that covers this area.

2 I don't know the workings of the CTA and what goes on behind the scenes. This is just my pure assumption.
 
Busjack
Better phrased than I did, and you got to the point quicker.

One figures that the graphic sign portion consists of a bunch of bitmaps or more likely jpegs. Compare that to the files for the orange LED signs, which consist of text and font commands, and in the case of color ones, color commands. For the uninitiated, you can use the RTF editor here in your browser to save text, but sw has to use a paint program and upload his paper bus pictures.

Sort of the same thing with the audio system. They could have used a synthesizer, but instead they have Mr. CTA recording various small audio files, there are programs that put the messages together and sequence them, and the operator logs into [presumably the same] console to have them play on his or her route.

In both cases, the files have to be preloaded before the operator can sign in. Doesn't mean that shops can't modify the preload.
 
See Tea Eh

1 This is by all means not a complete description of image storage and processing. There are many other aspects of computer science that covers this area.

2 I don't know the workings of the CTA and what goes on behind the scenes. This is just my pure assumption.

Basically correct, to the extent that I know. As for electronic signs on buses, as far as I can tell, there has only been one current sign program, per sign type, across the entire system. So, even the old RTSs with the thumbwheels and flip-dots had one program that could display any sign for any route system-wide (your observation of Novas with blank signs is more likely a function of either the sign or the Clever Devices unit not working, or a function of a new destination sign reading needing to be programmed and they hadn't gotten the bus flashed with the new program yet).
With modern computers, I'd have a very difficult time believing that computer memory is the reason they didn't program a lot more signs than are in the system.

One possible theory (and I say this with the caveat that I really don't know what was going on in the spec/procurement process) is something that you encounter a lot in transportation, and particularly in agencies that don't get out very much and see how the rest of the world does things (and CTA fits in that category). You have a lot of old heads that are just used to things being done exactly as they always have been. They are comfortable with how things are, and see no reason to change, even if the world has passed them by. Sometimes, they are forced to change simply because the old ways can no longer be accommodated (the forced switch to AC motors because nobody would build them a DC motor being an example; other systems had been using AC for decades).

When they do have to adopt new technology, they do everything they can to get the new technology to mimic what they're used to. I won't go into details, but there was one case a few years ago where some folks at CTA were using a really old mainframe computer system to do certain functions. That computer system was beyond the end of its life, and there was no choice but to buy newer computers. Even though there was a vendor that provided off-the-shelf modern software with excellent tech support that would run on the newer machines to do these functions, this group was fully ready to have the IT department build software with the exact same, decades-old interface (including the black screen with white text) to run on the new system just so the folks using the computers wouldn't have to learn anything new. Fortunately, in that case, the plan to make new "old" software was scrapped and eventually, CTA went with a vendor with off-the-shelf technology after some prodding by higher ups (the decision to scrap the old software was made in the Huberman era, and for all the bad rap he gets on here, Huberman was the only CTA president in recent memory...and perhaps ever...that really encouraged outside-the-box thinking to improve things).

While that's not exactly the same thing as railcar destination signs, it does demonstrate the lack of outside-the-box thinking that can exist in an organization filled with folks that have been there, and nowhere else, for decades.

The fact that the electronic signs (and they're not roll signs, there are no rollers anywhere) look like the signs on older equipment isn't really an issue. I think it's fine that they replicated the look of the roll sign on the electronic sign. But the folks writing the specs for the signs probably came from the mentality that you just have a limited set of destination signs available, and changing the available sign readings isn't something you'd want to do too often anyway, so why bother with signs that can be easily updated? The system has gone decades with limited sign displays, and things have worked out, so why should we expect anything different from the new fleet?

That kind of mentality demonstrates a lack of visionary thinking. What they theoretically could have done was specified a small USB port somewhere in the cab and have a technician walk through with a USB stick, plug it in, and the signs for that car would be updated in seconds (that's essentially how bus destination signs get updated these days, and it takes about five seconds per bus). Getting even more advanced, they could have specified a wireless distribution system with wireless hubs in the railyard, pushing out updates overnight (that's how Clever Devices gets updated on the buses). That would require some investment in infrastructure, but would eliminate the need for a person to physically interact with each car unless there was some glitch.

All of these things would be possible if they had been included in the equipment specs. However, when folks operate within their own little worlds and don't get out to see how things could be done, they'd never even think of half the stuff that could be included and would definitely be useful.

Again, this is just one possible theory for why the fleet is so complicated to get sign updates. It is by no means the definite explanation for what went on behind the scenes.
 
Busjack

Again well said.

As far as backwards, we have to remember that the original equipment for the 5000s was the orange LED signs; they hadn't figured out then that those could have been obtained at least in three color (RGB). These graphic signs were a change order because "color signs were not available then" (and I accept that the high definition ones weren't), but we really don't know what thought was at the time of the change order.

Given all the software that has to be loaded into a 5000 (not just this, but the ADA signs, diagnostics, motor control), loading through the LAN would make more sense. I thought they said something about the 5000s having a full time radio data connection. Maybe that was just for Tracker.

Your "behind" comment also reminds me that while the Chief Rail Engineer now recognizes such things as LCD maps, it appears that CTA is going full bore ahead with such things as the LED dots behind the mylar map on the 5000s. I don't expect CTA to retrofit the fist 225 or so cars, but as I said with the seats, it couldn't be that much more costly to install per the 7000 specs forward. Although the purchase of 900 mylar signs for this project is undoubtedly necessary for 2400s and 2600s, it certainly would be much easier to edit a new map for an LCD screen than have to change the map cards on the 5000s.
 

I started this topic to post photos and news about Monday's reroutes.....never thought I would get into a discussion about LED rollsigns. Hope you enjoyed the history. Hope Busjack finally learned that the first 5000 Bombardier series rollsigns were NOT PROGAMMABLE. Please don't quote this response....its TOO LONG!  EDIT.....I remember when the color LED debuted. It was on a Wednesday, after a CTA board meeting at 567. We all went to Clinton on Green line and waited for a special charter that was going to see an examination of resources about the re-routing including the south incline, Garfield station, etc. I got bumped since I was not a board member, current employee, or etc. LOL!! The train arrived and picked up the chosen few. It had the new color LEDs.

DH   

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7 hours ago, Scionic said:

The current full-color signs are programmable, as we've established. I am talking about the amber LED signs that came installed in 5001-5116 or so. Reading back through the thread it was indicated these were not programmable. 

Again, I don't see that. They are the same as the bus signs. They were never frozen on 54/Cermak.

The old signs are still on the inside, but I guess you can argue that the Ashland-63 sign is orange.

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28 minutes ago, Busjack said:

Again, I don't see that. They are the same as the bus signs. They were never frozen on 54/Cermak.

The old signs are still on the inside, but I guess you can argue that the Ashland-63 sign is orange.

See Scionic......He refuses to believe.  

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3 hours ago, chicagopcclcar said:

See Scionic......He refuses to believe.  

Why are you instigating? We get that Busjack currently blocks out your posts. That's a side issue best left out of the current discussion. And the conversation is still on civil grounds here, so there is no need for you to now instigate and try moving it to a point of incivility because of your past gripe.

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17 minutes ago, jajuan said:

Why are you instigating? We get that Busjack currently blocks out your posts. That's a side issue best left out of the current discussion. And the conversation is still on civil grounds here, so there is no need for you to now instigate and try moving it to a point of incivility because of your past gripe.

Thanks. This whole thing went on even before I joined as a member. I honestly don't know how we got to this point, as all the information on the reroute is published, official and not, and the LED signs display what they need to display.

On 4/1/2017 at 1:26 PM, Sam92 said:

I think the thing was 5000s to 63rd used yellow-yellow marker lights while the 2600s used yellow-green

Did they? I thought the 5000s also did Yellow-Green for 63rd. I know they did Yellow-Yellow for Howard and Roosevelt. I can't find any images for 63rd though.

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Why do some of you always say I'm instigating? Scionic came with a discussion about LEDs. He acknowledged that first electronic roll signs were not programmable. Kevin, Garmon, have seen my responses. I've stated the history so that Scionic can read it. If you don't want to read it, don't. I have no issue with you.

DH 

  

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10 hours ago, MTRSP1900-CTA3200 said:

Did they? I thought the 5000s also did Yellow-Green for 63rd. I know they did Yellow-Yellow for Howard and Roosevelt. I can't find any images for 63rd though.

Which gets to the interesting point that someone can be on a platform at Roosevelt or north of there today and see how the trains are classified.

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On April 1, 2017 at 9:30 AM, Sam92 said:

Car card showing map

Anyone know if only the cardboard car cards on the Red/Purple/Yellow and Green/Pink lines will display this? Was on the Brown line yesterday and the vinyl car cards were not yet updated to reflect this change. 

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It worked like a charm!  Ashland/63rd yard has plenty of room. They used the tail tracks too. Complete report due shortly.

 

DH

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12 hours ago, chicagopcclcar said:

Why do some of you always say I'm instigating? Scionic came with a discussion about LEDs. He acknowledged that first electronic roll signs were not programmable. Kevin, Garmon, have seen my responses. I've stated the history so that Scionic can read it. If you don't want to read it, don't. I have no issue with you.

DH 

  

You didn't just leave it at simply responding to Scionic though. You were trying to call Busjack out about ignoring your posts and trying to pull Scionic into that side issue with your comment about Jack refusing to agree him over a certain point and stating that he did the same to you in the past, even going as far as bringing up past posts that have nothing to do really with the current discussion. That's instigating sir. That said and the point made, we're not going to pull any further attention off the current discussion over this.

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13 hours ago, MTRSP1900-CTA3200 said:

Thanks. This whole thing went on even before I joined as a member. I honestly don't know how we got to this point, as all the information on the reroute is published, official and not, and the LED signs display what they need to display.

Did they? I thought the 5000s also did Yellow-Green for 63rd. I know they did Yellow-Yellow for Howard and Roosevelt. I can't find any images for 63rd though.

SB ......Yellow-Yellow 95th;  Yellow-Green Ashland/63.   NB All trains Yellow-Yellow.

DH

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After meeting the first train at 59th junction, Run 820, I selected several site to get a flavor of the south side on this first day of the Red line reroute. The first train was down about 10 minutes at Lake so it had been held up on the north side. There was no crowding on the south side main.  There was plenty of room for two routes on the Green line and the Red line reroutes. Photo 1....The first train approaches to home signal at 59th. Photo 2.... With markers showing, the eight car follows the rest of the consist onto the former Englewood branch. Photo 3....This southbound slows as it begins to cross the underpinning bridge over the Dan Ryan expressway at 59th St and Wentworth Ave. Photo 4....A northbound Red line train has the controller handle on full speed in-between Garfield Blvd. and 51st St.

DH

 

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9 hours ago, ThirdRailVision said:

Anyone know if only the cardboard car cards on the Red/Purple/Yellow and Green/Pink lines will display this? Was on the Brown line yesterday and the vinyl car cards were not yet updated to reflect this change. 

I saw the updated car cards on the Blue and Pink Lines today.

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