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Glb1974

Invisible Disabilities and Access Seats

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Some other states have new signs that include invisible disabilities on their access seats section for disabled persons, so that the public is aware that not everyone's disability is physical and/or visible. For example, someone battling cancer or MS or brain damage or mental disorder may need to sit closer to the front and even in the disabled access sections to gain assistance when traveling on public transportation. I was wondering if the CHA and other systems in Illinois, particularly in Chicago, would adopt the addition of invisible disabilities in their access signs in the future. 

 

Furthermore, while some people qualify for disability bus pass, others may be temporarily disabled and therefore not qualify for one, yet their disability can be proved with a recent emergency room receipt, a doctor's note, or a simple visible sign such as limping, walking with crutches, being pregnant, etc. Such disabilities are visible, though a disabilities bus pass has not been acquired yet. Do those people have the same rights to sit in access spots on the bus as those with visible or invisible disabled bus passes? 

 

By and large, it appears that there is overcrowding on some buses at certain times. I understand budget cuts are sometimes inevitable, but when it comes to crowding, do bus drivers attempt to reorganize seating so that those with disabilities can sit down anywhere in the bus and have priority for seating when the access seats are filled or utilized with 2 or more wheelchairs? 

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  1. RTA prescribes the signs now used by all 3 service boards.
  2. To qualify for a free or half fare RTA permit, one has to meet the qualifications in the permit application. See the RTA page and application, which does mention episodic disabilities. However, one still needs SSDI, Medicare or VA verification, or certification from a doctor. The forms of verification you suggest are not sufficient for a "disability pass." Whether anyone yields them a seat is a matter of courtesy.

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8 hours ago, Glb1974 said:

Some other states have new signs that include invisible disabilities on their access seats section for disabled persons, so that the public is aware that not everyone's disability is physical and/or visible. For example, someone battling cancer or MS or brain damage or mental disorder may need to sit closer to the front and even in the disabled access sections to gain assistance when traveling on public transportation. I was wondering if the CHA and other systems in Illinois, particularly in Chicago, would adopt the addition of invisible disabilities in their access signs in the future. 

 

Furthermore, while some people qualify for disability bus pass, others may be temporarily disabled and therefore not qualify for one, yet their disability can be proved with a recent emergency room receipt, a doctor's note, or a simple visible sign such as limping, walking with crutches, being pregnant, etc. Such disabilities are visible, though a disabilities bus pass has not been acquired yet. Do those people have the same rights to sit in access spots on the bus as those with visible or invisible disabled bus passes? 

 

By and large, it appears that there is overcrowding on some buses at certain times. I understand budget cuts are sometimes inevitable, but when it comes to crowding, do bus drivers attempt to reorganize seating so that those with disabilities can sit down anywhere in the bus and have priority for seating when the access seats are filled or utilized with 2 or more wheelchairs? 

I totally agree. I'm a Navy veteran, & in late October 2011, I myself have been diagnosed with acute mental disorder.

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On 1/25/2016 at 8:54 PM, ChicagoNova said:

I totally agree. I'm a Navy veteran, & in late October 2011, I myself have been diagnosed with acute mental disorder.

I'm a Marine Corps veteran and have been rated 100% T&P for a chronic mental condition as well.  Thanks for relating to and understanding my post. :) 

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On 1/25/2016 at 1:43 PM, Busjack said:
  1. RTA prescribes the signs now used by all 3 service boards.
  2. To qualify for a free or half fare RTA permit, one has to meet the qualifications in the permit application. See the RTA page and application, which does mention episodic disabilities. However, one still needs SSDI, Medicare or VA verification, or certification from a doctor. The forms of verification you suggest are not sufficient for a "disability pass." Whether anyone yields them a seat is a matter of courtesy.

Thank you for that info!  I actually appreciate the services in Chicago, which are vastly better for invisible disabled persons than many other transits throughout our nation!  :) I have a Ride Free card, so that has helped me tremendously.  Thank you!

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13 hours ago, Glb1974 said:

I'm a Marine Corps veteran and have been rated 100% T&P for a chronic mental condition as well.  Thanks for relating to and understanding my post. :) 

You're welcome. My current rating is 50%. I may try later on to get it increased.

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