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Based on what's on BusTracker, only about 5-10. However, the last I looked it showed only 2 500s and 3 6600s. Based on published notices, frequency has been increased on 171-172, but, of course, 173-174 are gone.

So would they divide those 3 ways? Or could FG be sending some down. I don't know how good they'll work now on route like #85A which will go to 20 minutes in the rush and 30 minutes at other times. Now that i mention it looks like #85A may be interlining with something else when it's running at 20 minutes. The route typically takes 25 minutes round trip on average and wouldn't work with the same bus. So something else to check out next week.

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New system maps are now available at rail stations for Feb 2010, and they show CTA service as it will be when the service cuts become effective on Sunday. It's another indication that the impetus to reduce service was hard set this time, and not simply just another doomsday scenario with real hopes of a miracle rescue at the last possible moment. They pretty much got the picture there would be no miracles from the state on the scale that helped avert the 2007 scenario.

On a lighter note, I find it amusing the bus photo they decided to use on the cover is a shot of one of Kedzie's NF artics parked along side a NABI artic, which we know bit the dust service-wise a year ago.

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New system maps are now available at rail stations for Feb 2010, and they show CTA service as it will be when the service cuts become effective on Sunday. It's another indication that the impetus to reduce service was hard set this time, and not simply just another doomsday scenario with real hopes of a miracle rescue at the last possible moment. They pretty much got the picture there would be no miracles from the state on the scale that helped avert the 2007 scenario.

On a lighter note, I find it amusing the bus photo they decided to use on the cover is a shot of one of Kedzie's NF artics parked along side a NABI artic, which we know bit the dust service-wise a year ago.

With the incompetent management presently and in past years, this is the end result! This is the final insult to our fellow 1000+ CTA brothers and sisters who are now and soon will be unemployed by this time tomorrow, they who worked hard and tireless to do a job, a job that not many people can do! This is the thanks they get!.

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Two questions here people.

1) Could the 49 Western route get assigned to 77th since it terminates at 79th/Western Terminal. And drivers could relieve at 79th Terminal just like 49A drivers ?

2) Speaking of the route 49A, could that run on weekends ?

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With the incompetent management presently and in past years, this is the end result! This is the final insult to our fellow 1000+ CTA brothers and sisters who are now and soon will be unemployed by this time tomorrow, they who worked hard and tireless to do a job, a job that not many people can do! This is the thanks they get!.

I noted a couple of your rants. While I can somewhat understand them, I remember that you said that you worked for a Pace contractor that also wasn't calling back its PTOs because it lost several of its Pace contracts, partially from being outbid and partially because Pace is also going through Feb. 7 cutacks. Given that whatever can be said about the CTA management and unions, the precipitating cause is that sales tax receipts are down 20% from what was projected, and the real estate transfer tax, which was for the CTA's benefit, is down 75% from what was projected, and, as Daley was reported to have said tonight, nobody is going back to the legislature for more taxes. So, unless you were among the marchers (including the other CTA) picketing in front of the Thompson Center to impose taxes on others, passing blame isn't going to change much.

Sorry I was mean.

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Two questions here people.

1) Could the 49 Western route get assigned to 77th since it terminates at 79th/Western Terminal. And drivers could relieve at 79th Terminal just like 49A drivers ?

2) Speaking of the route 49A, could that run on weekends ?

On CTA5750's comment, yes there was mismanagement in past years, but this one can't all be put on the management's doorstep. We're still in a recession. Everyone is taking a hit in one way or another. It's not a case of sticking to workers just for the sake of getting rid of them. If a lot of us can't afford to maintain current or past costs, why should we think the CTA should afford to? None of us wants to see people lose their jobs, but hopefully CTA really sees and uses this as a chance to operate more efficiently within its means.

On the question of the 49 and 49A, the 49 is already set to operate from the 74th Street and North Park garages come Sunday, so the answer to the first question is no with the qualifier that it probably could but that's not the plan. The second question's answer is also no because if they can't afford to keep the present service levels after tomorrow, where are they to get the money for extra service on 49A?

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...

The second question's answer is also no because if they can't afford to keep the present service levels after tomorrow, where are they to get the money for extra service on 49A?

Especially since CTA decided 12 years ago that it was not going to compete with Pace 349. There is still service there.

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Especially since CTA decided 12 years ago that it was not going to compete with Pace 349. There is still service there.

Which brings up an interesting point I was thinking of earlier. 349 will still be limited stop service north of 127th because Pace made the decision to reduce competition with CTA, and at the time of the decision X49 was there for the northern most two miles of 349. I understand that reasoning overall, but in a way 349 is unique because 49A is now the only CTA presence south of 79th and that's every half hour rush only. Also while it's true 49A is there, why didn't Pace start 349's limited stops north of 119th instead of 127th since that's Blue Island south of 119th, not Chicago?

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With the incompetent management presently and in past years, this is the end result! This is the final insult to our fellow 1000+ CTA brothers and sisters who are now and soon will be unemployed by this time tomorrow, they who worked hard and tireless to do a job, a job that not many people can do! This is the thanks they get!.

Yep, and I will be sitting at home watching the system fall apart until they call me back!

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Which brings up an interesting point I was thinking of earlier. 349 will still be limited stop service north of 127th because Pace made the decision to reduce competition with CTA, and at the time of the decision X49 was there for the northern most two miles of 349. I understand that reasoning overall, but in a way 349 is unique because 49A is now the only CTA presence south of 79th and that's every half hour rush only. Also while it's true 49A is there, why didn't Pace start 349's limited stops north of 119th instead of 127th since that's Blue Island south of 119th, not Chicago?

Don't have the answer to the last one. I sort of have a feeling that it was Pace's first implementation of trainman's ART theory, which Pace confirmed, and, after all, there is a similar situation on 350 and 352, where CTA doesn't run, with regard to posted stops only, although the stops seem much closer together there than what would be implied by ART.

One also has to consider that Western is basically forest preserve between 83rd and 93rd, so nothing is stopping in that stretch except at 87th.

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Yep, and I will be sitting at home watching the system fall apart until they call me back!

The system's been falling apart for some time. Only now were really seeing it! Massive service cuts, layoffs, lousy management, politics. Its a recipe for disaster! Busjack wants to get into the specifics which dont matter much now and yes, times are tough, but the bottom line is these managers are paid "lots of money" to figure out the transit agancy's finacial problems and look at it! Many of them in the past and current couldnt or cant figure it out even when times were good!

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The system's been falling apart for some time. Only now were really seeing it! Massive service cuts, layoffs, lousy management, politics. Its a recipe for disaster! Busjack wants to get into the specifics which dont matter much now and yes, times are tough, but the bottom line is these managers are paid "lots of money" to figure out the transit agancy's finacial problems and look at it! Many of them in the past and current couldnt or cant figure it out even when times were good!

Okay, so the managers are paid "'lots of money' to figure out the transit agancy's [sic] financial problems." They did, and determined that the system was a couple hundred million in the hole. What are they supposed to do? Make money appear out of nowhere? Start charging seniors to ride (contrary to state law, which nobody at CTA supported)? Raise fares (which was a decision by politicians, not CTA personnel, to borrow a bunch more money and use it to keep fares the same)? Moves were already made to freeze salaries (most non-union CTA employees have not had a raise in many years), cut wages (up to 18 furlough days and unpaid holidays), and increase pension contributions (despite what "Jeff" would like people to believe, the union members aren't the only ones who are seeing their pension withholdings increase). Many positions are going unfilled, and office staff are being forced to cover higher workloads, with less time to complete the tasks, and are being forced to "volunteer" for assignments to hand out flyers on buses, monitor loads, etc. (last time I checked, a bus operator will never have to drive more than one bus at a time, and they were eligible to be paid for any time worked beyond their normal schedule).

CTA is a large organization. By its nature, it will have a sizable administrative staff. And, yes, there will be some folks making a lot of money (that tends to happen when people are responsible for a billion-dollar operation).

It's also true that virtually every single government and public agency in the country are facing significant financial shortfalls right now. How that can be blamed on CTA managers is beyond me.

The fact is, no matter who is running CTA, significant cuts would have to happen. Even if CTA had a good administration, the nine-figure shortfall would still exist. Don't get me wrong, I am definitely not a fan of Rich Rodriguez or any of the City Hall cronies that he brought in. But even then, it's not their fault that the economy is in the crapper, and the sales and real estate taxes are coming up woefully short.

Now you could argue (and, validly, I'd add) that the service cut plan isn't the best. CTA seriously should have looked at targeted route eliminations instead of service span cuts, and should have chosen a combination of route cuts and headway changes, instead of this BS "no route elimination" mantra that will drive the company into the ground (I mean, seriously, does the #129 really need to exist? Really?). But it was politics that dictated the "no route elimination" plan, and in the end, your friendly local aldermen and mayor decided that was the best way to protect their reelection campaigns, and there wasn't anything anybody in the CTA could do about it (no matter how much money they made).

Still, no matter what way you slice it, route eliminations, service span cuts, frequency adjustments, the net result is still going to be a bunch of bus operators without jobs tomorrow. That's the problem you face in the world of passenger transportation, where it costs more than a dollar to collect a dollar's worth of revenue. That's the way it is in Chicago, that's the way it is in Rockford, that's the way it is in Milwaukee, Minneapolis, St. Louis, Los Angeles, New York, Toronto, Vancouver, Paris, etc. That's the way it is the world over. Transit systems don't make money, passenger railroads don't make money, even the airlines don't make money as a whole (and these are private businesses using investors' money). That's not Rich Rodriguez's fault. That's not any CTA manager's fault. It's not even Daley's fault, or 241's fault, or 308's fault. It's just the way the economics of transportation work.

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I have been pretty mum on a lot of this lately, mainly to keep my sanity and see how things played out. What I will say is this...the top brass at the CTA, Metra and Pace all suck. That is not to demonize all of the managers at these agencies. As often stated here, as long as the cronies continue to operate the systems here, expect more of this stuff to continue. As Rmad noted, the process and the politicalization of the cuts instead of reviewing and making realistic changes and adjustments appear to be non-existent. I firmly believe that a lot of what is going on here is the Mayor's (is he really a Democrat...sure is acting very Republican these days) determination to put the blame on the unions, and that is totally unfair. I don't think the workers ever get the credit they deserve for the jobs they perform. Remember, most of these people are out in the most trying conditions, terrifying areas (they do have security shields remember) putting themselves at risk and have the responsibility for thousands they serve daily. Them comments from people that just anyone could do this job need to have their heads examined. Most wouldn't last a week...I would love to see them work 71st street overnight for example.

In any event, I think that the union needs to stand firm on their position. First, this nonsense will continue. Until these clowns figure out how to run things, they will continue to cry poor...always have. The union has made concessions in the past and should take the approach that these 1100 layoffs are the ultimate concession, and the next time this happens(probably next December) they could remind everyone of the ultimate concession they made. Then at election time, it could be stated that the city, state or whomever was responsible for so many job losses and the reduction in service. All these people did was come to work and do their job every day.

If that is not good enough, take the furlough days. But take them on the following days....3rd and 4th of July, Venetian night, the day after Thanksgiving, Michigan Lights Saturday, Air Show, etc. I think you get the idea. Make all feel just how important these people are, and how much they are needed.

For now, I think it is all taken for granted.

As I say to all the operators I have encountered over the past few weeks..."hang in there....don't let them push you around, I am in your court !!!!!!!!"

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The system's been falling apart for some time. Only now were really seeing it! Massive service cuts, layoffs, lousy management, politics. Its a recipe for disaster! Busjack wants to get into the specifics which dont matter much now and yes, times are tough, but the bottom line is these managers are paid "lots of money" to figure out the transit agancy's finacial problems and look at it! Many of them in the past and current couldnt or cant figure it out even when times were good!

Sorry but you can't just ignore that a large part of CTA's budget shortfall is a structural one from smaller tax revenues due to the recession. Yes there's been mismanagement in the past. No one denies that. That part can be changed if folks put their heads together for constructive solutions. But you can't go throwing what is a largely a structural deifict due to much smaller tax revenues at management's doorstep. Like it or not that part of the situation does matter if you want a real solution to some of CTA's inequities. If there are still management problems at the CTA it doesn't get solved by conveniently ignoring facts to fit an argument for change even when others agree with you that there's room for improvement. And let's keep things in perspective. Yes there are some route eliminations and frequency reductions. But remember three years ago the scenario was to eliminate a third of the routes, including all of the North Lake Shore express service, and take out 700 buses rather the current nine route eliminations and 280 (the count before the 28 or so mentioned before this week) buses removed. From looking at some of the schedules a lot of the frequency reductions are removal of frequency improvements made in the past few years or reversions to what we had in the late 90s after the BoozAllen reductions. Also many of the routes that got end time extensions recently get to keep those end times. Those could have been taken away like recent improvements on other routes. A couple routes actually have an end time extension by virtue of having a terminus closer to the new garage assignment than its current one.

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Many of these "split" routes are not quite what they seem at first glance. For instance, #94 will be basically a Chicago Av route, but 74th has a few rush hour trippers on weekdays. Only real "splits" appear to be Halsted and Western. Others are weekday-only or weekday-rush-only.

Also, some other changes: Interlining is now going to be MUCH more common. For istance, all routes out of 95th/Ryan (#29 included!) are now basically considered one "group" with buses freely moving between routes, and a bus rarely leaving 95th and the same route it came in on. Jeff Park is similar, but not as extreme, and several other core interlines exist, such as #65, #66, and #74.

#120,121,122,123,125 go back to their old status as being worked by whatever is handy, with buses from all garages except Forest Glen seen there, usually making one trip each. #134 and #143 are similar, with buses from 77th and 103rd in addition to Kedzie and North Park.

Other odd workings: Firest Glen and 103rd each do a single trip on 151 from Belmont to Union Station in the AM rush, Kedzie has three trips on 77-Belmont in the AM, also one trip on 1-Indiana/Hyde Park and one on 29-State. Note just ONE round trip!

Andre

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The sad part, Robert, is that you are absolutely right. This whole situation is political. Politicians only really care about getting reelected. This is why they dictated "no route eliminations" and "senior free rides must stay". This way, almost everybody who goes by bus today will still be able to get there tomorrow, and it won't cost them any more. It might take longer, and they might have to go a different way, but they will still be able to get there.

Now the matter of concessions. Look around you. Almost every union has been forced to make concessions last couple of years, be they in private industry or government. The fact is this country is in a recession, almost a depression. Private businesses are not making or selling anything near what they were a few years back. Government isn't taking in anywhere near the tax revenues they were a few years ago. Some will deny this, but most folks who live in the real world know this is how it is. How come 241 thinks they are immune from reality? How many people would even have the balls to ask for a pay increase these days? Most people who still have jobs are thrilled they have them, and if they have to accept pay CUTS to keep their jobs will be quite happy to do so. The reality is that Chicago can't absorb another 1100 unemployed. The jobs are not there. And those that do find other jobs will absolutely, certainly, no doubt about it, make less.

On a personal level, I am being laid off tomorrow. If you told me I have a choice of layoff or a pay cut to $12.00 an hour from $18.00 for the rest of my days, I would accept so fast it would make your head spin. I look at these arrogant asses making $28.00 an hour and bleating about how they "need" their pay increase, and I'm sorry, it makes me sick. I wish CTA could have really addressed the issue, and laid off starting at the TOP of the seniority list, get rid of the highest paid ones first.

Can anybody drive a bus? No. But can a lot of folks? Absolutely. Can anybody work the front counter at McDonald's? Same answer. CTA could, if they wanted to, replace their entire work force in a matter of months. Remember the "job fair" in 2008, when the line of applicants went CLEAR AROUND THE BLOCK? Sorry, this is not a job that requires great technical knoweledge or great physical ability. Just being able to get along with people, and drive decently. There is no shortage of people with those qualifications. Especially not with 10% unemployment.

A prediction: Nothing much will happen until September now. By then, a few cuts will be "rescinded", mostly by adding an earlier or later trip. By then, the public will have gotten used to less service, and there will be no real need to decrease headways except in maybe a few cases. This is permanent, just like every service cut in CTA's history, 1961, 1973, 1981, 1995, etc. NONE were ever rescinded, except in a few cases where politicians intervened, such as the three or four (depending on whether you count the X20) resurrections of the Washington Express. Once service is cut, it basically stays cut.

Andre

Okay, so the managers are paid "'lots of money' to figure out the transit agancy's [sic] financial problems." They did, and determined that the system was a couple hundred million in the hole. What are they supposed to do? Make money appear out of nowhere? Start charging seniors to ride (contrary to state law, which nobody at CTA supported)? Raise fares (which was a decision by politicians, not CTA personnel, to borrow a bunch more money and use it to keep fares the same)? Moves were already made to freeze salaries (most non-union CTA employees have not had a raise in many years), cut wages (up to 18 furlough days and unpaid holidays), and increase pension contributions (despite what "Jeff" would like people to believe, the union members aren't the only ones who are seeing their pension withholdings increase). Many positions are going unfilled, and office staff are being forced to cover higher workloads, with less time to complete the tasks, and are being forced to "volunteer" for assignments to hand out flyers on buses, monitor loads, etc. (last time I checked, a bus operator will never have to drive more than one bus at a time, and they were eligible to be paid for any time worked beyond their normal schedule).

CTA is a large organization. By its nature, it will have a sizable administrative staff. And, yes, there will be some folks making a lot of money (that tends to happen when people are responsible for a billion-dollar operation).

It's also true that virtually every single government and public agency in the country are facing significant financial shortfalls right now. How that can be blamed on CTA managers is beyond me.

The fact is, no matter who is running CTA, significant cuts would have to happen. Even if CTA had a good administration, the nine-figure shortfall would still exist. Don't get me wrong, I am definitely not a fan of Rich Rodriguez or any of the City Hall cronies that he brought in. But even then, it's not their fault that the economy is in the crapper, and the sales and real estate taxes are coming up woefully short.

Now you could argue (and, validly, I'd add) that the service cut plan isn't the best. CTA seriously should have looked at targeted route eliminations instead of service span cuts, and should have chosen a combination of route cuts and headway changes, instead of this BS "no route elimination" mantra that will drive the company into the ground (I mean, seriously, does the #129 really need to exist? Really?). But it was politics that dictated the "no route elimination" plan, and in the end, your friendly local aldermen and mayor decided that was the best way to protect their reelection campaigns, and there wasn't anything anybody in the CTA could do about it (no matter how much money they made).

Still, no matter what way you slice it, route eliminations, service span cuts, frequency adjustments, the net result is still going to be a bunch of bus operators without jobs tomorrow. That's the problem you face in the world of passenger transportation, where it costs more than a dollar to collect a dollar's worth of revenue. That's the way it is in Chicago, that's the way it is in Rockford, that's the way it is in Milwaukee, Minneapolis, St. Louis, Los Angeles, New York, Toronto, Vancouver, Paris, etc. That's the way it is the world over. Transit systems don't make money, passenger railroads don't make money, even the airlines don't make money as a whole (and these are private businesses using investors' money). That's not Rich Rodriguez's fault. That's not any CTA manager's fault. It's not even Daley's fault, or 241's fault, or 308's fault. It's just the way the economics of transportation work.

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I am 56 years old, so my experience with buses goes back to the early 60's. At that time, crowding on buses was normal. For instance, wht was the the Outer Drive Express (now 147) regularly left Walton in the PM rush NB with people on the BOTTOM STEP. Routes like Pulaski (which is what I rode the most, living at Pulaski and Palmer), it was normal to let buses by because you could not physically squeeze on. And we are talking about a 3 or 4 minute rush headway. Archer ran a 30-SECOND headway out of downtown with standing loads. Riding over the years has gone down, WAY, WAY down. There are only a very few routes that still have anywhere near the riding they had 40 years ago, and when you factor in the much, much reduced service levels today, even those routes have lost the vast majority of their riders.

As for 35th St in prticular: Public schedules do not show the whole story any more. In this case, the buses are coming out of 77th garage. Buses starting at Kedzie come via Dan Ryan-Pershing-Kedzie, those starting at Cottage Grove come via Dan Ryan and 35th. These trips do not show up on any public schedules, as they are not "intended" to carry passengers, so that they can make the trip a few minutes faster than if they entered service at the Dan Ryan. This is now very common, buses pulling in and out via the fastest routing passible instead of following the regular route in service to the closest point to the garage as was the norm for decades. Why? Since there is no "daily minimum guarantee" any more, if you can reduce the time a run is on the street by a few minutes, it is a few less dollars you have to pay the driver. Every penny saved...

Andre

Where are you seeing these pullouts in the new 35 schedule you keep talking about? All I see is full trips from its terminus at 36th/Kedzie to Cottage Grove and the one short trip from the Orange Line in the morning weekdays. As for the 12, have you been on it lately? It's not just during time that the high schools I mentioned that let out that the route is crowded. Lately it's been having some good sides crowds before PM rush periods even start more like midday off-peak times. I live along the route and use it daily so I now what I'm talking about here. The high schools are a part of it, but not the end all or be all of the crowded conditions. You have a lot of vetarans from the west end that go to the VA. Once they're gone, the buses crowd right back up with UIC students, folks working for the hospitals in the Medical District, those shopping or working at the Target store at Clark, and those going to the Red, Orange and Green Lines. So again even if runs are freed up on 134, 143, 145, 148 and 151 short runs, those artics can be used elsewhere on other Kedzie routes as they had been doing in recent months to begin with. I'm not saying they'll still need 65, but I don't see this mad dash to move out half.

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A few quickies:

  • I guess I was right about the interlining. Also, as put this way, it makes sense.
  • For those who say that the {expletive deleted} will really hit the fan in the 2011 budget season, there is a mayoral election in Feb. 2011, so you and the other riders will have whatever voice you'll have then. I sort of have the feeling that with this type of stuff going on, and no hope for the mythical Olympic bailout, King Richard II might abdicate. It is probably a better bet that at least three people who won a primary on Tuesday are not going to win the general election (and this assumption is based on that the Republican candidate has not been determined, but the Democrat made the other one concede), so those who think that state fiscal mismanagement and free rides for seniors have a role in this, again you will have an opportunity to vent in November, although, again, I don't know how effectively.
  • I go back to about 1968 with regard to CTA, and my observations are about the same. Ridership is way down, and Krambles's book confirms that in that the number of originating fares then (i.e. people putting 45 cents in the fare box) is about the number of unlinked trips today, which means that what was an originating fare probably now is 2 or 3 unlinked trips, and the CTA says it collects less than $1 per ride the way it computes things. With the kind of people reported on the CTA Tattler, I can't see how anyone would take a discretionary ride on the L.
  • To throw on the 35 bandwagon, the big traffic generator then was "Spiegel of Chicago Illinois." Think about all the steel mills that are no longer on the South Side. Ford still has a plant, but it can't support a bus. If you look at the Pace site, the UPS routes to one of the lowest paying employers are drying up.
  • You can probably also throw on that fire that places like around the South Side Green Line or Halsted in Englewood were torched, and are not generating ridership. Hence, I agree with the "no need to save every route number" argument--there is certainly no justification for saving 1 Indiana (which does not go to Hyde Park).
  • The Pace budget at least indicated how many riders were affected and how many dollars would be saved on each route. It would be interesting to see that from CTA, but we won't.

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A few quickies:

  • I guess I was right about the interlining. Also, as put this way, it makes sense.
  • For those who say that the {expletive deleted} will really hit the fan in the 2011 budget season, there is a mayoral election in Feb. 2011, so you and the other riders will have whatever voice you'll have then. I sort of have the feeling that with this type of stuff going on, and no hope for the mythical Olympic bailout, King Richard II might abdicate. It is probably a better bet that at least three people who won a primary on Tuesday are not going to win the general election (and this assumption is based on that the Republican candidate has not been determined, but the Democrat made the other one concede), so those who think that state fiscal mismanagement and free rides for seniors have a role in this, again you will have an opportunity to vent in November, although, again, I don't know how effectively.
  • I go back to about 1968 with regard to CTA, and my observations are about the same. Ridership is way down, and Krambles's book confirms that in that the number of originating fares then (i.e. people putting 45 cents in the fare box) is about the number of unlinked trips today, which means that what was an originating fare probably now is 2 or 3 unlinked trips, and the CTA says it collects less than $1 per ride the way it computes things. With the kind of people reported on the CTA Tattler, I can't see how anyone would take a discretionary ride on the L.
  • To throw on the 35 bandwagon, the big traffic generator then was "Spiegel of Chicago Illinois." Think about all the steel mills that are no longer on the South Side. Ford still has a plant, but it can't support a bus. If you look at the Pace site, the UPS routes to one of the lowest paying employers are drying up.
  • You can probably also throw on that fire that places like around the South Side Green Line or Halsted in Englewood were torched, and are not generating ridership. Hence, I agree with the "no need to save every route number" argument--there is certainly no justification for saving 1 Indiana (which does not go to Hyde Park).
  • The Pace budget at least indicated how many riders were affected and how many dollars would be saved on each route. It would be interesting to see that from CTA, but we won't.

On the whole what's a traffic generator issue, it's easy to say what's not justified in being saved when not living in that community. Sure industries of decades ago may longer be in some of those communities but there are still plenty of hard working people in those communities who need to get to school or work in other of the city. The South Side in some respects is already underserved compared to other parts of the city so how far are they supposed to cut? While on the topic, those who have suggested they didn't cut enough routes how much are they supposed to cut before they cutting their nose from their face? A perception is already out there now that come tomorrow the sky is going to fall when it comes to service with people speaking of switching to cars. I'm more of the mind that they needed to do what they needed to close their budget hole, but a truly longterm solution is needed.

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On the whole what's a traffic generator issue, it's easy to say what's not justified in being saved when not living in that community. Sure industries of decades ago may longer be in some of those communities but there are still plenty of hard working people in those communities who need to get to school or work in other of the city. The South Side in some respects is already underserved compared to other parts of the city so how far are they supposed to cut? While on the topic, those who have suggested they didn't cut enough routes how much are they supposed to cut before they cutting their nose from their face? A perception is already out there now that come tomorrow the sky is going to fall when it comes to service with people speaking of switching to cars. I'm more of the mind that they needed to do what they needed to close their budget hole, but a truly longterm solution is needed.

Some of the areas I mentioned, such as around the South Side Green Line, seem to have been leveled, and since in the early 70s they had three flats and brownstones, I assume that there are people who once lived and boarded there who no longer do. There seem to be plenty of those kind of areas around the south side. I recognize that there is some new construction on 63rd and that area east of Woodlawn Ave., and east of Cottage Grove and north of 47th. On the other hand, if anyone who lived on the Dan Ryan corridor between 35th and 54th actually rode the bus, they aren't there now.

However, the real answer is that the transit authorities have the ridership information. Both Pace and CTA have door readers (although on the CTA that might be limited to buses acquired after 2002) and have the exact gps location of each passenger boarding and departing. CTA at least publishes its productivity numbers. So, if there is a line that doesn't meet productivity standards, and doesn't meet whatever the current service standard for coverage is (such as 90% of the people have a bus within 1/4 or 1/2 mile), then the route gets cut. 1 Indiana-Hyde Park should be a no brainer, because 3 and 29 are within 1/4 mile of it. Restructuring 55A and 55N should also have been a no brainer, except that rmadison said that the alderman got in the way. I wonder if Andre knows of any other specific example. In any event, ridership statistics indicate that a VIP van would be more than adequate for such areas as 55A/N, some of the NW side Blue Line feeders, and stuff like N201. Pace at least talks that game; CTA should investigate it. It may still have to pay a driver, but at least it would reduce its capital cost and decrease fuel consumption from 3.4 mpg to maybe 17.

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There have been other cases of aldermanic interference. The 1980's were probably the worst. 99, 162, 164 kept running for several years after the Midway L opened because the old biddies complined about having to transfer, until the big cuts in 1995 made them absolutely unjustifiable. Then there was a scheme from about the same era that would have replaced the 30 south of 118th St with dial-a-bus service. That went nowhere either thanks to the local alderman. 31st St came back as an hourly bus after the local polly complained. There are others, but these come to mind immediately. Oh, and let us not forget Central Park station on the Lake St L...

Andre

Some of the areas I mentioned, such as around the South Side Green Line, seem to have been leveled, and since in the early 70s they had three flats and brownstones, I assume that there are people who once lived and boarded there who no longer do. There seem to be plenty of those kind of areas around the south side. I recognize that there is some new construction on 63rd and that area east of Woodlawn Ave., and east of Cottage Grove and north of 47th. On the other hand, if anyone who lived on the Dan Ryan corridor between 35th and 54th actually rode the bus, they aren't there now.

However, the real answer is that the transit authorities have the ridership information. Both Pace and CTA have door readers (although on the CTA that might be limited to buses acquired after 2002) and have the exact gps location of each passenger boarding and departing. CTA at least publishes its productivity numbers. So, if there is a line that doesn't meet productivity standards, and doesn't meet whatever the current service standard for coverage is (such as 90% of the people have a bus within 1/4 or 1/2 mile), then the route gets cut. 1 Indiana-Hyde Park should be a no brainer, because 3 and 29 are within 1/4 mile of it. Restructuring 55A and 55N should also have been a no brainer, except that rmadison said that the alderman got in the way. I wonder if Andre knows of any other specific example. In any event, ridership statistics indicate that a VIP van would be more than adequate for such areas as 55A/N, some of the NW side Blue Line feeders, and stuff like N201. Pace at least talks that game; CTA should investigate it. It may still have to pay a driver, but at least it would reduce its capital cost and decrease fuel consumption from 3.4 mpg to maybe 17.

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Observations today (2/6/10):

Archer garage is being filled with 6000's. Kedzie as of 5pm had about 20 sitting out back running, ready to go. Intertestingly, they are being washed and fueled before going to Archer. Also, Archer runs were still pulling in to Archer as of 5pm. I gather mechanics will be moving buses later tonight, but as of visit, it appeared most Novas were still home, though many were parked outside as Flx's were taking over at least four bays.

Andre

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