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pudgym29

Philadelphia | SEPTA

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I recently spent some time in Philadelphia, PA. for the American Homebrewers' Assoc.'s National Homebrew Conference. During one afternoon, I went out from downtown and got photographs of SEPTA's Route #15; the line with the restored postwar Presidents' Conference Committee streetcars. B) achCfUwD.jpg adqmkZ9y.jpg abwPnyK9.jpg abcLPZsY.jpg absAgtR7.jpg acdTXV9S.jpg acezO1m8.jpg advw3GwU.jpg abjVAzI7.jpg add2ALoX.jpg

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Besides probably still being around at at least 65 years, the surprising thing is that they were able to retrofit the LED signs in them. Also, the interior with the brown seats is much more realistic than the one with the blue plastic ones.

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Nice pictures! I visited Philadelphia back in 1998 and 1999 and managed to ride quite a few of SEPTA's lines.

I really wondered how they got PCC 2733 in that spot to display it. :huh:

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The gas pedal style controls seem weird to me. I don't imagine it would feel very "natural", having gas/brake pedals, but no steering wheel.

Were very many streetcars operated this way? I am building a short interurban line on my HO scale layout. Found an antique coffee grinder box, with a handle that looks like an old style motorman's throttle handle, hid a power pack inside the coffee grinder box, linked the grinder handle to it, so my interurban line controls look like an old motorman's throttle. Plus built a foot operated "Trolley bell" for it too. Use a push button to ring an electric bell, push button is mounted to the floor.

These gas/brake pedal controls almost ruin it for me, even though the clerestory cars I run (Rebuilt from paper/wood Varney shorty cars with new ends and an Athearn mechanism underneath), would have had the old style throttle in real life.

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The gas pedal style controls seem weird to me. I don't imagine it would feel very "natural", having gas/brake pedals, but no steering wheel.

Were very many streetcars operated this way? I am building a short interurban line on my HO scale layout. Found an antique coffee grinder box, with a handle that looks like an old style motorman's throttle handle, hid a power pack inside the coffee grinder box, linked the grinder handle to it, so my interurban line controls look like an old motorman's throttle. Plus built a foot operated "Trolley bell" for it too. Use a push button to ring an electric bell, push button is mounted to the floor.

These gas/brake pedal controls almost ruin it for me, even though the clerestory cars I run (Rebuilt from paper/wood Varney shorty cars with new ends and an Athearn mechanism underneath), would have had the old style throttle in real life.

Reportedly, standard for PCCs except for CSL/CTA, which used the crank controls later recycled into the L cars.

Toronto cars had the grab rail (and I suppose that those now running in Kenosha do). I made sure to check, because I wondered onto what the operator would hold if there wasn't a steering wheel or controller.

Also, an explanation why CSL/CTA cars were different was that because conductors collected the fares, the motormen didn't have that responsibility, while motormen on other systems had to have their hands free to collect fares and punch or rip transfers. It is not indicated how CTA rebuilt some for one man operation.

Interurbans would have crank controls and an air brake handle, while the PCCs, being all electric, would only have the controllers.

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Reportedly, standard for PCCs except for CSL/CTA, which used the crank controls later recycled into the L cars.

Also, an explanation why CSL/CTA cars were different was that because conductors collected the fares, the motormen didn't have that responsibility, while motormen on other systems had to have their hands free to collect fares and punch or rip transfers. It is not indicated how CTA rebuilt some for one man operation.

Interurbans would have crank controls and an air brake handle, while the PCCs, being all electric, would only have the controllers.

.

Two comments, CSL's PCCs were hand controlled through 2 levers not using controller handles found on the 6000s. Visit IRM some day that the 4391 is operating to see how it works.

And not all PCCs were all electric. The prewar ones had air brakes, still pedal operated however.

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...

Interurbans would have crank controls and an air brake handle, while the PCCs, being all electric, would only have the controllers.

Thanks, Busjack. That makes me feel a lot better :lol:

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On 1/22/2017 at 9:57 AM, Pace831 said:

Last night I saw a new SEPTA New Flyer 30' bus going east on I-80/294. They also have a contract for new 40' buses.

The linked SEPTA report on the 40 foot buses mentions that once those hybrid Xcelsiors are all delivered, SEPTA's hybrid buses will comprise 95% of the total bus fleet. 

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18 hours ago, pudgym29 said:

For all you motor coach maniacs, here is a post about a new motor bus route being institituted on SEPTA (notice how its run number is sufficiently messed up).

Man, that bus has been 3 years in the making. Useful for me when I go to see friends at Drexel, especially since the MFL likes to single-track so often

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